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Results tagged “Environment”

April 2, 2014

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The Associated Press reports in the Danville Register & Bee, "Duke Energy is asking a judge to prevent citizens groups from taking part in any enforcement action that would make the company clean up nearly three dozen coal ash pits across North Carolina... But Frank Holleman, a senior attorney with the Southern Environmental Law Center, said Duke's motion runs counter to what the company has been saying since a Feb. 2 massive coal ash spill at Duke's plant in Eden, which coated 70 miles of the Dan River in toxic sludge."

Progressive Point: Our families' drinking water must be kept safe. The process to protect that water must be just as secure. Allowing big corporations to keep the public in the dark when it comes to our water, especially in regards to the cleanup of an environmental disaster, erases any accountability and our public trust.

Transparency is essential to ensure we are aware, active, and that we trust our elected representatives. The Dan River coal ash spill and the chemical leak in West Virginia are two examples of why we must constantly be wary. They are proof of what happens when we don't enforce strong rules to protect our water and families. It is clear that our drinking water today is vulnerable to serious risks--a spill in one part of our Commonwealth could contaminate our tap water and make it undrinkable for millions of Virginia families. Virginia needs greater accountability, not less, to make sure that big corporations aren't cutting corners or we'll end up with more Dan River disasters.

Get the Facts:

  • Duke Energy has now asked a judge to hide from the public and "shield its records from North Carolina regulators and environmental groups while a federal criminal probe is ongoing."(Danville Register & Bee, April 1, 2014)
  • Frank Holleman, a senior attorney with the Southern Environmental Law Center, recently stated, "Duke officials have said they are better than this, that they want to do the right thing for the state and they want to take action to protect our water resources. But instead of cleaning up, what they've done is lawyer up. They have filed a legal document in court denying any legal liability whatsoever." (Danville Register & Bee, April 1, 2014)
  • Up to 82,000 tons of coal ash has spilled out of a broken storm pipe at a retired coal-plant site and into the Dan River in North Carolina according to Duke Energy, the energy company that owns the site. (Washington Post, February 6, 2014)
  • Currently there are no federal regulations for coal ash storage. Standards for storage are handled at the state level. (Washington Post, February 6, 2014)
  • "The environmental group Earthjustice has found 207 sites in 37 states where coal ash has already contaminated the water or air in violation of federal health standards. For example: Out in Prince George's County Maryland, millions of tons of coal ash from a landfill leaked into a nearby creek after two recent hurricanes." (Washington Post, February 6, 2014)
  • In January, a chemical used for coal processing was spilled into a West Virginia river. 300,000 residents were told not to use their water - not for drinking, not for bathing, not even after boiling it. (CNN, January 13, 2014)

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March 28, 2014

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The Richmond-Times Dispatch opines, "The Feb. 2 coal ash spill into the Dan River is, by any measure, an unmitigated disaster. Seventy miles of river have been polluted with sludge... The spill also might become a talking point in the debate over uranium mining in Virginia... [R]egulators in Virginia should commence a review of the dozen coal-ash sites scattered around the commonwealth. The public should have absolute assurance of their safety. If any of them pose a risk of leaking, the state should take corrective steps - before a spill, rather than after one."

Progressive Point: As Virginia's population and economy continues to grow, our vital water resources need greater protection - not less. Without adequate oversight, our drinking water, health, farmland, property values, wildlife and tourism industry are all at risk. The Dan River coal ash spill and the chemical leak in West Virginia are two more examples of what happens when we don't enforce strong rules to protect our water and families.

We need leaders who prioritize keeping us and our Commonwealth's water safe. That means our elected officials must stand up to corporate special interests that would flood them with campaign donations in order to expose our environment to the dangers of fracking and uranium mining. Today there are zero federal standards on how coal ash is disposed of or recycled. We need to make sure that big corporations aren't cutting corners or we'll all end up with disasters like the Dan River spill or without drinking water like the folks in West Virginia. Zero oversight is bad for families, bad for the environment, and bad for business.

Get the Facts:

  • Up to 82,000 tons of coal ash has spilled out of a broken storm pipe at a retired coal-plant site and into the Dan River in North Carolina according to Duke Energy, the energy company that owns the site. (Washington Post, February 6, 2014)
  • Currently there are no federal regulations for coal ash storage. Standards for storage are handled at the state level. (Washington Post, February 6, 2014)
  • "The environmental group Earthjustice has found 207 sites in 37 states where coal ash has already contaminated the water or air in violation of federal health standards. For example: Out in Prince George's County Maryland, millions of tons of coal ash from a landfill leaked into a nearby creek after two recent hurricanes." (Washington Post, February 6, 2014)
  • In January, a chemical used for coal processing was spilled into a West Virginia river. 300,000 residents were told not to use their water - not for drinking, not for bathing, not even after boiling it. (CNN, January 13, 2014)
  • "Nearly all natural gas extraction today involves a technique called hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in which dangerous chemicals are mixed with large quantities of water and sand and injected into wells at extremely high pressure. Fracking is a suspect in polluted drinking water in Arkansas, Colorado, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia and Wyoming, where residents have reported changes in water quality or quantity following fracturing operations." (NRDC)
  • Rick Parrish, senior attorney with the Southern Environmental Law Center in Charlottesville, stated that the Taylorsville basin, where energy companies are pushing to frack in Virginia, is protected from drilling by Virginia law due to its proximity to the Chesapeake Bay. (Free Lance-Star, December 12, 2013)

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March 17, 2014

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The Free Lance-Star editorial page staff opines, "[H]ydraulic fracking in the Northern Neck does not make sense to us. The risk is not worth the reward... Water could, in our lifetimes, become more valuable to us than gas or oil. No amount of money can fix a ruined aquifer, and no amount of promises can ensure that it won't happen."

Progressive Point: Risking Virginia's drinking water puts our families' health at risk. The environmental disasters that have recently befallen the Dan River and West Virginia's drinking water make it clear today that these dangers are very real. Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, jeopardizes our families' health and natural heritage solely for the benefit of corporate special interests.

Fracking releases dangerous chemicals into the ground, threatening our water supply today and the environment we will leave our children tomorrow. The Dan River coal ash spill and the chemical leak in West Virginia are two more examples of what happens when we open ourselves up to unnecessary environmental threats. Virginia doesn't have to similarly prioritize polluters over the legacy we will leave our children. Our drinking water, our health, our farmland, our property values, our wildlife and tourism across Virginia are all at risk.

Get the Facts:

  • Rick Parrish, senior attorney with the Southern Environmental Law Center in Charlottesville, stated that the Taylorsville basin, where the energy company wants to frack, is protected from drilling by Virginia law due to its proximity to the Chesapeake Bay. (Free Lance-Star, December 12, 2013)
  • "Nearly all natural gas extraction today involves a technique called hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in which dangerous chemicals are mixed with large quantities of water and sand and injected into wells at extremely high pressure. Fracking is a suspect in polluted drinking water in Arkansas, Colorado, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia and Wyoming, where residents have reported changes in water quality or quantity following fracturing operations." (NRDC)
  • Up to 82,000 tons of coal ash has spilled out of a broken storm pipe at a retired coal-plant site and into the Dan River in North Carolina according to Duke Energy, the energy company that owns the site. (Washington Post, February 6, 2014)
  • Currently there are no federal regulations for coal ash storage. Standards for storage are handled at the state level. (Washington Post, February 6, 2014)
  • "The environmental group Earthjustice has found 207 sites in 37 states where coal ash has already contaminated the water or air in violation of federal health standards. For example: Out in Prince George's County Maryland, millions of tons of coal ash from a landfill leaked into a nearby creek after two recent hurricanes." (Washington Post, February 6, 2014)
  • In January, a chemical used for coal processing was spilled into a West Virginia river. 300,000 residents were told not to use their water - not for drinking, not for bathing, not even after boiling it. (CNN, January 13, 2014)

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March 6, 2014

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The Virginian-Pilot Editorial Board opines, "Offshore drilling for oil and gas has taken another step closer to Virginia's beaches... Loud noises can have catastrophic effects on wildlife, but the [Bureau of Ocean Energy Management] determined the damage from seismic exploration would be 'moderate,' injuring 138,000 marine mammals and disrupting the migration or feeding patterns of 13.6 million other animals, according to reporting by National Geographic. Such discounting of potential damage doesn't inspire confidence, but it's hardly the only danger of offshore drilling minimized by its supporters. The approaching prospect of drilling platforms in deep water off prime Virginia tourism territory is fraught with risks that are being ignored."

Progressive Point: The middle class Virginia jobs of the future are in clean energy manufacturing. Our Commonwealth's economy depends on leaders who will create those jobs and work for the people who elected them--not the fossil fuel lobbyists bankrolling campaigns. Prioritizing polluters over the legacy we will leave our children is bad policy.

Our Commonwealth could be leading the country by developing clean, safe resources that will create permanent Virginia jobs while preserving our unique environment. Today, drinking water disasters in West Virginia and Southside demonstrate how fragile our natural resources really are. Dangerous policies like uranium mining and fracking only put our environment and drink water at further risk. We don't need to add the dangers of offshore drilling to the mix. Affordable, domestic energy is something we all want without those risks--so is a strong economic and environmental legacy we can leave our children.

Get the Facts:

  • "In the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon disaster, not even supporters would argue that drilling poses no threat to Virginia's $21 billion tourism industry, or the 200,000 jobs it supports. Since drilling advocates can find just 18,000 petroleum-related jobs (and only if they cite a study done by the American Petroleum Institute itself), that's hardly a wise economic-development move for coastal communities like ours." (Virginian-Pilot, March 6, 2014)

  • Up to 82,000 tons of coal ash has spilled out of a broken storm pipe at a retired coal-plant site and into the Dan River in North Carolina according to Duke Energy, the energy company that owns the site. (Washington Post, February 6, 2014)
  • In January, a chemical used for coal processing was spilled into a West Virginia river. 300,000 residents were told not to use their water - not for drinking, not for bathing, not even after boiling it. (CNN, January 13, 2014)
  • "Nearly all natural gas extraction today involves a technique called hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in which dangerous chemicals are mixed with large quantities of water and sand and injected into wells at extremely high pressure. Fracking is a suspect in polluted drinking water in Arkansas, Colorado, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia and Wyoming, where residents have reported changes in water quality or quantity following fracturing operations." (NRDC)
  • "Wind power advocates have said Virginia is uniquely positioned to nurture the industry because of the relatively shallow waters offshore and strong winds. It also has the coastal infrastructure - a shipbuilding industry and a deepwater port - to allow for building and delivering turbines." (Associated Press, October 10, 2012)
  • "Clean energy is the fastest growing industry in the U.S. today.Developing new clean energy technologies like wind and solar could support 20 million jobs by 2030 and trillions of dollars in revenue." (Media Matters)
  • Offshore wind could create up to 10,000 jobs in Virginia according to a study cited by Delegate Joseph Morrissey and 13 fellow state legislators. (Virginian-Pilot, May 8, 2012)

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Keep our water and families safe

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February 26, 2014

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The Danville Register & Bee reports, "Danville City Council got a close look at the coal ash storage pond that sent tons of ash and contaminated water into Danville's drinking water source Feb. 2. As the group looked over the almost water-free primary ash storage basin, Danville Vice Mayor Gary Miller asked when both the primary and secondary basins would be moved away from the edge of the Dan River. 'It's a ticking time bomb sitting on the river,' Miller said."

Progressive Point: We need leaders who work for us--and will prioritize keeping us and the water we drink safe. Without adequate oversight, our drinking water, health, farmland, property values, wildlife and tourism industry are all at risk. The Dan River coal ash spill and the chemical leak in West Virginia are two more examples of what happens when we don't enforce strong rules for corporations.

Our leaders are elected to promote and protect our safety. Today there are zero federal standards on how coal ash is disposed or recycled. We need to make sure that big corporations aren't cutting corners or we'll all end up with disasters like the Dan River spill in North Carolina and Southside, VA or without drinking water like the folks in West Virginia. Virginia doesn't have to similarly prioritize polluters over the legacy we will leave our children. Zero oversight is bad for families, bad for the environment, and bad for business.

Get the Facts:

  • Up to 82,000 tons of coal ash has spilled out of a broken storm pipe at a retired coal-plant site and into the Dan River in North Carolina according to Duke Energy, the energy company that owns the site. (Washington Post, February 6, 2014)

  • Currently there are no federal regulations for coal ash storage. Standards for storage are handled at the state level. (Washington Post, February 6, 2014)

  • "The environmental group Earthjustice has found 207 sites in 37 states where coal ash has already contaminated the water or air in violation of federal health standards. For example: Out in Prince George's County Maryland, millions of tons of coal ash from a landfill leaked into a nearby creek after two recent hurricanes." (Washington Post, February 6, 2014)

  • In January, a chemical used for coal processing was spilled into a West Virginia river. 300,000 residents were told not to use their water - not for drinking, not for bathing, not even after boiling it. (CNN, January 13, 2014)

  • "Wind power advocates have said Virginia is uniquely positioned to nurture the industry because of the relatively shallow waters offshore and strong winds. It also has the coastal infrastructure - a shipbuilding industry and a deepwater port - to allow for building and delivering turbines." (Associated Press, October 10, 2012)

  • "Clean energy is the fastest growing industry in the U.S. today.Developing new clean energy technologies like wind and solar could support 20 million jobs by 2030 and trillions of dollars in revenue." (Media Matters)

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February 7, 2014

The News & Advance reports, "As coal ash continued to settle into the sand of the Dan River on Thursday, North Carolina's governor assured reporters at the Duke Energy spill site the utility would be held accountable for cleanup. Behind N.C. Gov. Pat McCrory on Thursday afternoon, crews worked to excavate the storm water pipe that broke beneath the ash pond at the utility's retired coal-power plant in Eden, N.C., seeping 82,000 tons of the heavy-metal laden substance carried by 27 million gallons of water into the Dan River since at least Sunday, when an employee noticed the level of the ash pond had dropped."

Progressive Point: Affordable, domestic energy is something we all want. So is clean drinking water. Today there are zero federal standards on how coal ash is disposed or recycled. We need to make sure that big corporations aren't cutting corners or we'll all end up with disasters like the Dan River spill in North Carolina and Southside, VA or without drinking water like the folks in West Virginia.

Without adequate oversight, our drinking water, health, farmland, property values, wildlife and tourism across Virginia are all at risk. The North Carolina and Southside, VA coal ash spill and the chemical leak in West Virginia are two more examples of what happens when we don't enforce strong rules for corporations that deal in dangerous substances and processes. Virginia doesn't have to similarly place polluters over the legacy we will leave our children. Zero oversight is bad for families, bad for the environment, and bad for business.

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Get the Facts:

  • Up to 82,000 tons of coal ash has spilled out of a broken storm pipe at a retired coal-plant site and into teh Dan River in North Carolina according to Duke Energy, the energy company that owns the site. (Washington Post, February 6, 2014)
  • Currently there are no federal regulations for coal ash storage. Standards for storage are handled at the state level. (Washington Post, February 6, 2014)
  • "The environmental group Earthjustice has found 207 sites in 37 states where coal ash has already contaminated the water or air in violation of federal health standards. For example: Out in Prince George's County Maryland, millions of tons of coal ash from a landfill leaked into a nearby creek after two recent hurricanes." (Washington Post, February 6, 2014)
  • In January, a chemical used for coal processing was spilled into a West Virginia river. 300,000 residents were told not to use their water - not for drinking, not for bathing, not even after boiling it. (CNN, January 13, 2014)
  • "Wind power advocates have said Virginia is uniquely positioned to nurture the industry because of the relatively shallow waters offshore and strong winds. It also has the coastal infrastructure - a shipbuilding industry and a deepwater port - to allow for building and delivering turbines." (Associated Press, October 10, 2012)
  • "Clean energy is the fastest growing industry in the U.S. today.Developing new clean energy technologies like wind and solar could support 20 million jobs by 2030 and trillions of dollars in revenue." (Media Matters)

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Fracking Virginia's future

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December 13, 2013

The Free Lance-Star reports, "Shore [Exploration and Production Corp.] has secured mineral leases on more than 84,000 acres in the [Taylorsville] basin. [Stan] Sherrill [president of Shore Exploration and Production Corp.] has said the company hopes to begin drilling within a year to 18 months. Rick Parrish, cqsenior attorney with the Southern Environmental Law Center in Charlottesville, said DMME [Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy] is the lead regulatory agency, reviewing and granting drilling permit applications. But he said the agency, 'has absolutely nothing on the books pertaining to shale fracking' proposed by Shore. 'They have no experience with this kind of hydrofracking.'"

Progressive Point: Today, Virginia has the opportunity to grow our economy by leading the country in creating new renewable energy jobs. Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, dangerously risks our families' health and natural heritage solely for the benefit of corporate special interests. That places energy company profits over the legacy we will leave our children.

Our Commonwealth could be leading the country on energy by developing clean, safe resources that will create permanent Virginia jobs while preserving our unique environment. Clean energy is the fastest growing industry in the U.S. today. Virginia should be leading the way in creating renewable energy jobs. What kind of legacy will we leave for our children in Virginia? Fracking releases dangerous chemicals into the ground, threatening our water supply today and the environment we will leave our children tomorrow.  Our drinking water, our health, our farmland, our property values, our wildlife and tourism across Virginia are all at risk. 

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Get the Facts:

  • Rick Parrish, senior attorney with the Southern Environmental Law Center in Charlottesville, stated that the Taylorsville basin, where the energy company wants to frack, is protected from drilling by Virginia law due to its proximity to the Chesapeake Bay. (Free Lance-Star, December 12, 2013)<
  • "Nearly all natural gas extraction today involves a technique called hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in which dangerous chemicals are mixed with large quantities of water and sand and injected into wells at extremely high pressure. Fracking is a suspect in polluted drinking water in Arkansas, Colorado, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia and Wyoming, where residents have reported changes in water quality or quantity following fracturing operations." (NRDC)
  • "Wind power advocates have said Virginia is uniquely positioned to nurture the industry because of the relatively shallow waters offshore and strong winds. It also has the coastal infrastructure - a shipbuilding industry and a deepwater port - to allow for building and delivering turbines." (Associated Press, October 10, 2012)
  • "Clean energy is the fastest growing industry in the U.S. today.Developing new clean energy technologies like wind and solar could support 20 million jobs by 2030 and trillions of dollars in revenue." (Media Matters)

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Fracturing Virginia's environmental legacy

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November 26, 2013

The Free Lance-Star reports, "Though the industry says fracking can be done safely and responsibly, Friends of the Rappahannock is gearing up to address environmental concerns about an energy company's drilling plans from Caroline County through the Northern Neck and Middle Peninsula. The Fredericksburg-based river conservation group is holding two workshops in December 'for landowners considering leasing or who have already leased their land for oil drilling,' according to a press release. The meetings are also 'for elected officials and members of the public concerned about landowner rights and the impacts of gas development.'"

Progressive Point: What kind of legacy will we leave for our children in Virginia? Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, releases dangerous chemicals into the ground, threatening our water supply and our natural heritage. Basically, dirty, out-of-state, energy companies profit while we take on all the risks. That places corporate profits over the legacy we will leave our children.

Our Commonwealth could be leading the country on energy by developing clean, safe resources that will create permanent Virginia jobs while preserving our unique environment. Clean energy is the fastest growing industry in the U.S. today. Virginia should be leading the way in creating renewable energy jobs. Fracking risks our natural heritage for the benefit of a corporate special interests.

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  • Friends of the Rappahannock will be holding two workshops on fracking in December:
    • Wednesday, December 11, 6:30 to 8:30 pm, Bowling Green


    • Thursday, December 12, 6:30 to 8:30 pm, Oak Grove or Montross   (exact locations to be provided)
  • "Nearly all natural gas extraction today involves a technique called hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in which dangerous chemicals are mixed with large quantities of water and sand and injected into wells at extremely high pressure. Fracking is a suspect in polluted drinking water in Arkansas, Colorado, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia and Wyoming, where residents have reported changes in water quality or quantity following fracturing operations." (NRDC)
  • "Wind power advocates have said Virginia is uniquely positioned to nurture the industry because of the relatively shallow waters offshore and strong winds. It also has the coastal infrastructure - a shipbuilding industry and a deepwater port - to allow for building and delivering turbines." (Associated Press, October 10, 2012)
  • "Clean energy is the fastest growing industry in the U.S. today.Developing new clean energy technologies like wind and solar could support 20 million jobs by 2030 and trillions of dollars in revenue." (Media Matters)

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November 13, 2013

The Virginian-Pilot reports, "Gov.-elect Terry McAuliffe said Monday he would veto any legislation to facilitate uranium mining in Virginia. The issue has resonance in Hampton Roads, which draws drinking water from Lake Gaston, downstream from a rich uranium deposit in Pittsylvania County. Mining interests have been trying for years to get a 31-year-old moratorium lifted so the ore can be mined. Speaking with reporters after a Veterans Day event at Nauticus, McAuliffe said he would veto any bill to lift the moratorium or to establish a regulatory framework for mining."

Progressive Point: Our Commonwealth's communities, from Pittsylvania to Virginia Beach, have voiced their opposition to risking contaminating our drinking water with radioactive uranium waste. Elected officials who prioritize corporate greed above the safety of Virginia families do not share our values and priorities. Exposing Virginia to uranium means money for special interests, but it isn't in the best interest of healthy families.

Terry McAuliffe understands that uranium mining isn't just a potential disaster for Southside. Our drinking water, our health, our farmland, our property values, our wildlife and tourism across Virginia are at risk. The operation could contaminate drinking water for families as close as Martinsville and as far away as Fairfax and Hampton Roads. Communities across Virginia are rejecting uranium mining in Virginia and it's time for our leaders to follow McAuliffe and do the same.

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  • 60 government entities and over 100 other organizations have taken action related to keeping the ban on uranium mining in Virginia. A full list can be found at KeepTheBan.org.
  • Virginia Uranium, the company seeing to mine uranium in Virginia, has hired over a dozen lobbyists from five different firms and has donated over $150,000 to political campaigns in the last 4 years. (VPAP)
  • Del. Donald Merricks, Del. Danny Marshall III, Del. James Edmunds, Del. Tommy Wright, and Sen. Frank Ruff all said in a letter to Virginia's General Assembly that the risk of uranium mining to the people of Virginia and its environment is too great and that the ban should not be lifted. (Virginian-Pilot, January 3, 2012)
  • A NAS study validated the concern that a flood, hurricane, or earthquake could result in an uncontrolled release at a uranium facility--all three of which Virginia experienced last year. (Cale Jaffe, senior attorney, Southern Environmental Law Center, Keep the Ban, December 19, 2011)

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May 30, 2013

The Virginian-Pilot reports, "More than nine out of 10 Virginians live in localities that have been hit by at least one federally declared weather disaster since 2007 - an accelerating trend linked to global warming, a new report says. The report from the nonprofit Environment Virginia Research & Policy Center says human-induced climate change is likely to bring even more extreme weather events - including heavy rain and snow, heat, drought, wildfires, hurricanes and coastal storms - in years to come if carbon emissions are not curtailed."

Progressive Point: In Virginia there's no longer any doubt we have a serious problem. Climate disruption is happening right here, right now, and it's making weather disasters and record-breaking heat waves worse. Furthermore, the threat of climate change is accepted by 97% of scientists. If 97 out of 100 doctors warned you to not eat tainted food, would you still eat it?

If we want to protect our kids and grandkids, we have to deal with climate change before it gets out of control. Anyone who doubts whether we're up to the task is ignoring what America is capable of.  American businesses are starting to use the amazing energy technologies that our engineers have developed -- including panels that harness power from the sun and turbines that capture energy from the wind. We need to speed up the use of these technologies and spur more innovation. America should be leading the world in clean energy solutions, not getting left behind by Europe and China.

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  • Nine out of 10 Americans say the U.S. should make an effort to reduce global warming, even if it has economic costs, and 9 out of 10 Americans agree that developing sources of clean energy should be a priority for the President and Congress. (Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Sept. 2012)
  • Climate change is accepted scientific consensus. 97% of scientists studying weather and climate agree that climate change is real, that it is happening here & now, and that it is caused by manmade industrial carbon pollution. (University of Illinois at Chicago, January, 2009)
  • Globally, the 10 warmest years on record all happened in the past 15 years. Nobody who is younger than 28 has ever experienced a colder-than-average month because the last such month was February 1985. (NOAA)
  • Carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere is the highest it's been in at least 650,000 years overall and at least 800,000 years in some regions. (NASA, USA Today

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May 7, 2013

The Roanoke Times reports, "Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli took his campaign for governor to the Roanoke area today, telling a group at Titan Cement in Troutville that he favored allowing hydro-fracking for natural gas in the George Washington National Forest."

Progressive Point: What kind of legacy will we leave for our children? Under Ken Cuccinelli's plan to allow dangerous fracking in the George Washington National Forest, dirty energy companies profit while we take on all the risks. Fracking releases dangerous chemicals into the ground, threatening our water supply and our natural heritage. Cuccinelli's plan prioritizes corporate donors over Virginia families.

The best way to lower energy prices is by developing clean, safe resources that will create permanent Virginia jobs while preserving our unique environment. Clean energy is the fastest growing industry in the U.S. today. Virginia should be leading the country in creating renewable energy jobs. Fracking risks our natural heritage for the benefit of a few campaign donors.

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  • "Nearly all natural gas extraction today involves a technique called hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in which dangerous chemicals are mixed with large quantities of water and sand and injected into wells at extremely high pressure. Fracking is a suspect in polluted drinking water in Arkansas, Colorado, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia and Wyoming, where residents have reported changes in water quality or quantity following fracturing operations." (NRDC)

  • ThinkProgress reports:

"In the first quarter of 2013, Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli II (R) raised about $2.4 million for his gubernatorial campaign. Of that, a huge portion came from oil and gas interests -- likely impressed by his long record of active climate denial... Cuccinelli accepted about $200,000 from energy companies and executives. These included:

1. Murray Energy Corporation, $50,000
2t. CONSOL Energy Inc., $25,000
2t. Dominion Political Action Committee (Dominion Resources, Inc.), $25,000
4t. Marvin Gilliam (retired VP of Cumberland Resources Corp.), $25,000
4t. Koch Industries Inc., $25,000
6t. American Electric Power Committee for Responsible Government (American Electric Power), $10,000
6t. William B. Holtzman (president and owner of Holtzman Oil), $10,000
6t. Range Resources Corporation, $10,000
9t. Thomas Farrell (CEO of Dominion Resources, Inc.), $5,000
9t. Michael G. Morris (President and CEO of American Electric Power), $5,000
9t. Baxter F. Phillips Jr. (an executive with Alpha Natural Resources, Inc.), $5,000
9t. Clyde E. Stacy (an executive with Pioneer Group/Rapoca Energy.), $5,000

Between these donations and the RGA's funds, about half of Cuccinelli's contributions over the reporting period were tied to oil, gas, and coal."

  • Offshore wind could create up to 10,000 jobs in Virginia according to a study cited by Delegate Joseph Morrissey and 13 fellow state legislators. (The Virginian-Pilot, May 8, 2012)

  • "Wind power advocates have said Virginia is uniquely positioned to nurture the industry because of the relatively shallow waters offshore and strong winds. It also has the coastal infrastructure - a shipbuilding industry and a deepwater port - to allow for building and delivering turbines." (Associated Press, October 10, 2012)

  • "Clean energy is the fastest growing industry in the U.S. today.Developing new clean energy technologies like wind and solar could support 20 million jobs by 2030 and trillions of dollars in revenue." (Media Matters)

  • President Obama supports renewing tax incentives for new wind project while Mitt Romney opposes them. Despite wind energy's huge potential for Virginia jobs, Bob McDonnell has not taken a position on the issue because of the election. (Virginian-Pilot, October 10, 2012)

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December 4, 2012

The Virginian-Pilot reports, "A Richmond-area lawmaker plans to file legislation that would lift Virginia's longstanding ban on uranium mining and impose a tax on the radioactive ore extracted from the ground. State Sen. John Watkins, a Powhatan County Republican, revealed those plans Monday, days after the release of a state-backed study that laid out the regulatory steps necessary before mining can occur but that didn't take sides."

Progressive Point: Communities from all corners of the Commonwealth have voiced their opposition to risking contaminating our drinking water with radioactive uranium waste. Elected officials who prioritize corporate greed above the safety of Virginia families do not share our values and priorities.

Ending the 30-year ban on uranium mining in Virginia would only help corporate bottom lines while endangering our homes and health.  Our communities have spoken and state officials should follow their lead: keep the ban on unsafe mining of hazardous uranium. Exposing Virginia to uranium means money for special interests, but it isn't in the interest of the health of our families.

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  • "Environmental groups are pledging to fight the bill hard, as are the South Hampton Roads cities of Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Chesapeake, Portsmouth and Suffolk. All five are worried about radioactive materials escaping the mine and contaminating water that downstream becomes a major drinking-water supply for the region." (Virginian-Pilot, December 4, 2012)
  • Those communities against removing the uranium ban includes Chesapeake, Norfolk, Virginia Beach, and Suffolk. (Richmond Times-Dispatch, September 12, 2012) The South Boston Town Council also approved a second $5,000 contribution to help keep the ban. (Gazette-Virginian, Sept. 10, 2012)

  • Virginia Uranium, the company seeing to mine uranium in Virginia, has hired over a dozen lobbyists from five different firms and has donated over $150,000 to political campaigns in the last 4 years. (VPAP)

  • Del. Donald Merricks, Del. Danny Marshall III, Del. James Edmunds, Del. Tommy Wright, and Sen. Frank Ruff all said in a letter to Virginia's General Assembly that the risk of uranium mining to the people of Virginia and its environment is too great and that the ban should not be lifted. (Virginian-Pilot, January 3, 2012)

  • A recent NAS study validated the concern that a flood, hurricane, or earthquake could result in an uncontrolled release at a uranium facility--all three of which Virginia experienced last year. (Cale Jaffe, senior attorney, Southern Environmental Law Center, Keep the Ban, December 19, 2011)

  • In 2009, the Pittsylvania County Board of Supervisors called for "a study to determine no harm would come to the county and its residents before the moratorium could be lifted... The resolution being discussed at Tuesday's board meeting stated the NAS study showed Virginia has no experience with uranium mining and there's no guarantee there would be no release of radioactive sediments downstream of the Coles Hill site and, therefore, the criteria of the original resolution in 2009 have not been satisfied." (Danville Register and Bee, September 5, 2012)

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Rejecting uranium mining

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November 29, 2012

The Martinsville Bulletin reports, "Martinsville City Council on Tuesday officially voiced its support for keeping a ban on uranium mining in Virginia. In a unanimous vote, the council adopted a legislative agenda for 2013 that asks the General Assembly to maintain the moratorium because 'engaging in uranium mining would result in highly damaging effects on all other economic development efforts in the region, excluding the jobs created by a mine itself.' Area residents who support the ban filled the council chambers. They applauded after the legislative agenda was adopted."

Progressive Point: Communities across the Commonwealth are demanding we keep the nearly 30-year ban on uranium mining that keeps Virginia safe and protects our families' health. Foreign-backed special interests are trying to lift the ban so they can make money while we get all the risk. Trading the agenda of a few special interests for the health and safety of Virginia families is a bad deal.

Uranium mining isn't just a potential disaster for Southside. Our drinking water, our health, our farmland, our property values, our wildlife and tourism across Virginia are at risk. The operation could contaminate drinking water for families as close as Martinsville and as far away as Chesapeake. Communities across Virginia are rejecting uranium mining in Virginia and it's time for our leaders to do the same.

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  • Those communities against removing the uranium ban will include Chesapeake this week, Norfolk, Virginia Beach, and Suffolk. (Richmond Times-Dispatch, September 12, 2012) The South Boston Town Council also approved a second $5,000 contribution this week to help keep the ban. (Gazette-Virginian, Sept. 10, 2012)

  • Virginia Uranium, the company seeing to mine uranium in Virginia, has hired over a dozen lobbyists from five different firms and has donated over $150,000 to political campaigns in the last 4 years. (VPAP)

  • Del. Donald Merricks, Del. Danny Marshall III, Del. James Edmunds, Del. Tommy Wright, and Sen. Frank Ruff all said in a letter to Virginia's General Assembly that the risk of uranium mining to the people of Virginia and its environment is too great and that the ban should not be lifted. (Virginian-Pilot, January 3, 2012)

  • A recent NAS study validated the concern that a flood, hurricane, or earthquake could result in an uncontrolled release at a uranium facility--all three of which Virginia experienced last year. (Cale Jaffe, senior attorney, Southern Environmental Law Center, Keep the Ban, December 19, 2011)

  • In 2009, the Pittsylvania County Board of Supervisors called for "a study to determine no harm would come to the county and its residents before the moratorium could be lifted... The resolution being discussed at Tuesday's board meeting stated the NAS study showed Virginia has no experience with uranium mining and there's no guarantee there would be no release of radioactive sediments downstream of the Coles Hill site and, therefore, the criteria of the original resolution in 2009 have not been satisfied." (Danville Register and Bee, September 5, 2012)

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November 1, 2012

The Roanoke Times editorializes, "While it is impossible to say that any single weather event was caused by climate change, Sandy has been just the sort of storm climate models forecast and serves as a terrible reminder of global warming's ever-growing threat... Sandy's well-earned nickname, Frankenstorm, is a not-so-subtle reminder that this week's suffering is partly of our own making. State and national leaders busying themselves today with disaster relief should continue that leadership tomorrow by openly discussing global warming and actually doing something about it."

Progressive Point: As we saw this week, climate change and sea level rise are very real problems for our country and Virginia. We also saw that disaster coordination is one of the most vital functions of our federal government, but Mitt Romney would privatize it and guarantee less funding for disaster response by turning it all over to cash-strapped states.

Denying climate change exists won't make it go away. Conservative politicians like Romney are playing politics rather than seeking out solutions for Virginia families. Failing to even acknowledge threats to our neighborhoods, economy, and environment is a failure of leadership. We can do something about climate change today. The overwhelming majority of voters agree we should start doing more with the energy technologies that we already have to run our economy cleanly and affordably.

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  • Last year, Republicans in Congress proposed cutting FEMA's budget by nearly $90 million; in 2012, they proposed over $180 million more in cuts. In fact, Republicans even threatened to shut down the entire government last year if funding for disaster relief wasn't offset by spending cuts elsewhere. (Media Matters, October 29, 2012)

  • Scientific tide measurements in Norfolk show the sea level has risen by 14.5 inches in the last 100 years with the trend expected to continue. (Virginian-Pilot, June 10, 2012)

  • The city of Norfolk spends $6 million a year to elevate roads, improve drainage, and help homeowners raise their houses. 5 percent to 10 percent of the city's lowest-lying neighborhoods have heavy flooding. Additionally, the naval base spends hundreds of millions of dollars brace piers to withstand rising water. (ThinkProgress, June 10, 2012)

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October 25, 2012

The Washington Post reports, "George Allen, the Republican fighting Democrat Tim Kaine in Virginia's closely watched battle for the U.S. Senate, caught some unexpected flak Wednesday over his energy policy in the form of friendly fire from a Republican congressman in Maryland. During a campaign stop in Gaithersburg on Wednesday, Rep. Roscoe Bartlett, who is in a tough election fight of his own in Maryland's 6th congressional district, was waxing passionately about the need to move the country beyond fossil fuels. Sometimes members of his own party don't seem to understand how critical the need is to push toward new, renewable and environmentally friendly energy sources, Bartlett said."

Progressive Point: Virginia needs leaders who work for the people who elected them, not the fossil fuel lobbyists bankrolling campaigns. George Allen stands with coal and Big Oil against clean energy jobs but that won't bring down gas prices or put Virginians back to work.

The middle class jobs of the future are in clean energy manufacturing. We need to create these jobs now to stay competitive with countries like China. Fossil fuel company CEOs don't need any extra help from taxpayers and George Allen. The best way to lower gas prices is to reduce our dependence on oil by developing clean, safe sources of energy that will create American jobs and never run out. It's time we start exporting energy, not jobs. Let's put Americans back to work building wind turbines, solar panels, and energy-efficient products that say "Made in America."

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  • Offshore wind could create up to 10,000 jobs in Virginia according to a study cited by Delegate Joseph Morrissey and 13 fellow state legislators. (The Virginian-Pilot, May 8, 2012)

  • "Wind power advocates have said Virginia is uniquely positioned to nurture the industry because of the relatively shallow waters offshore and strong winds. It also has the coastal infrastructure - a shipbuilding industry and a deepwater port - to allow for building and delivering turbines." (Associated Press, October 10, 2012)

  • "Clean energy is the fastest growing industry in the U.S. today. Developing new clean energy technologies like wind and solar could support 20 million jobs by 2030 and trillions of dollars in revenue." (Media Matters)

  • President Obama supports renewing tax incentives for new wind project while Mitt Romney opposes them. Despite wind energy's huge potential for Virginia jobs, Bob McDonnell has not taken a position on the issue because of the election. (Virginian-Pilot, October 10, 2012)

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Home front investments create jobs

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October 10, 2012

The Roanoke Times reports, "Nine of every 10 Roanoke City Public Schools teachers returned to work this school year, resulting in one of the lowest turnover rates in recent years. 'It appears the salary increase had an effect on that,' said Sandra Burks, the division's executive director of human resources... 'This is the best report we've ever seen,' school board member Lori Vaught said." The Associated Press also reports, "The large-scale development of wind power off the Mid-Atlantic coast would create more than 70,000 jobs from New York to Virginia, an industry-sponsored study concludes. The study released Wednesday said those jobs would be created by a new industrial base needed to manufacture, build, operate and maintain the towering wind turbines, and an additional 40,000 jobs would be needed to serve the supply chain."

Progressive Point: Home front investments - funding for our schools, police officers, and clean energy here at home - are our shared investment in Virginia's future. We invest in our schools and teachers so our children can get the best education, in our roads and bridges so our businesses can move their products, and in clean energy, the fastest growing industry in the U.S. today, because it creates jobs.

Investments in Virginia's home front strengthen and benefit us all. They drive our Commonwealth's competitiveness, create opportunities for new businesses, and help our families stay healthy and safe. Mitt Romney and Bob McDonnell want to keep cutting our investments in Virginia's home front, just to give the richest few even more special tax breaks the rest of us can't get. Romney wants to get rid of Obamacare and pass health care costs down onto the states. McDonnell keeps passing the buck on home front investments down from the state to our cities and counties. You don't invest less in the things you value, and Virginians value our Commonwealth's communities.

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  • Roanoke City Public Schools "gave employees minimum 1 percent raises this fiscal year after three years of frozen wages... Teacher retention as of Sept. 30 was 90.4 percent, which is up more than 3 percentage points from last year." (Roanoke Times, October 10, 2012)

  • In addition to the 110,000 jobs created by wind power and its supply chain, 50,000 support jobs, such as restaurants and groceries could also be created. (Associated Press, October 10, 2012)

  • "Large-scale wind development off the Atlantic coast would also have a combined economic impact for the states of $19 billion and increase local, state and federal government revenues by $4.6 billion, the study by information and analytics company IHS Inc. concluded." (Associated Press, October 10, 2012)

  • "Wind power advocates have said Virginia is uniquely positioned to nurture the industry because of the relatively shallow waters offshore and strong winds. It also has the coastal infrastructure - a shipbuilding industry and a deepwater port - to allow for building and delivering turbines." (Associated Press, October 10, 2012)

  • "Clean energy is the fastest growing industry in the U.S. today. Developing new clean energy technologies like wind and solar could support 20 million jobs by 2030 and trillions of dollars in revenue." (Media Matters)

  • President Obama supports renewing tax insentives for new wind project while Mitt Romney is opposing them. Despite wind energy's huge potential for Virginia jobs, Bob McDonnell is playing politics and remaining silent and not taking a position on the issue because of the election. (Virginian-Pilot, October 10, 2012)

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Clean energy creates jobs

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October 2, 2012

The Virginian-Pilot reports, "Charging that Dominion Virginia Power has 'ripped off' ratepayers for $76 million, environmentalists are planning five days of protests in Richmond this week urging changes to state rules intended to encourage development of wind, solar and other green energy. The activists say the rules, known collectively as the Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard, or RPS, have done little to push utilities to invest more in cleaner energy supplies."

Progressive Point: Clean energy is the fastest growing industry in the U.S. today. Virginia should be leading the country in creating renewable energy jobs, not getting left behind. Instead of protecting Big Oil at the expense of taxpayers, let's invest in cleaner, safer sources of energy that won't ever run out and will put millions of Americans across the country and Virginians right here back to work.

Over the past five years, Big Oil raked in over half a trillion dollars in profits and laid off more than 10,000 Americans. Clean energy is the fastest growing industry in the U.S. today and creates three times as many jobs as fossil fuels. This should be obvious: the oil industry is no longer a new start-up that needs help getting off the ground. Big Oil is raking in billions in profits but still taking billions in taxpayer handouts, keeping our nation hooked on oil, and lobbying to kill off their clean energy competitors. It couldn't be any clearer: Big Oil is leaving us behind while clean energy is creating jobs.

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    • "A nearly unanimous 92% of voters feel it is very important (58%) or somewhat important (34%) for the United States to develop and use solar power," including 98% of Democrats, 95% of Independents, and 84% of Republicans.

    • 85% of voters have a favorable view of solar power, with 82% of voters also holding a favorable view of wind power. This support is nearly universal, "regardless of party or demographics."

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September 18, 2012

The Danville Register & Bee reports, "The governor's office and state Sen. Bill Stanley are denying that Gov. Bob McDonnell worked behind the scenes to convince the Pittsylvania County Board of Supervisors to table a proposed resolution on uranium mining. Callands-Gretna Supervisor Jerry Hagerman taped an Aug. 31 phone call in which Stanley tried to persuade Hagerman to hold off on passing the resolution... In the 20-minute conversation that began at about 10:30 p.m. on Aug. 31, Stanley told Hagerman the governor told him to 'reach out' to supervisors on the matter. Stanley now says he 'misspoke' and the governor did not tell him to call board members."

Progressive Point: Leaders should be upfront with us on where they stand on issues that affect our health and safety. Bob McDonnell says he's not sure about uranium mining, but then why is he bullying local officials on behalf of his uranium industry campaign donors? Keeping the ban on uranium protects clean drinking water and keeps Virginia safe without risking our communities' health. Special interests want to remove the ban to make money off of risking our health.

Uranium mining isn't just a potential disaster for Southside. The operation could contaminate drinking water for families as far away as Chesapeake. We need honest leaders who work for us but Bob McDonnell isn't being straight with Virginians. He tells us one thing and then turns around and goes to bat for his campaign donors behind the scenes. We cannot afford to trade the agenda of a few special interests for the health and safety of Virginia families.

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  • Those communities against removing the uranium ban will include Chesapeake this week, Norfolk, Virginia Beach, and Suffolk. (Richmond Times-Dispatch, September 12, 2012) The South Boston Town Council also approved a second $5,000 contribution this week to help keep the ban. (Gazette-Virginian, Sept. 10, 2012)

  • Virginia Uranium, the company seeing to mine uranium in Virginia, has hired over a dozen lobbyists from five different firms and has donated over $150,000 to political campaigns in the last 4 years. (VPAP)

  • Del. Donald Merricks, Del. Danny Marshall III, Del. James Edmunds, Del. Tommy Wright, and Sen. Frank Ruff all said in a letter to Virginia's General Assembly that the risk of uranium mining to the people of Virginia and its environment is too great and that the ban should not be lifted. (Virginian-Pilot, January 3, 2012)

  • A recent NAS study validated the concern that a flood, hurricane, or earthquake could result in an uncontrolled release at a uranium facility--all three of which Virginia experienced last year. (Cale Jaffe, senior attorney, Southern Environmental Law Center, Keep the Ban, December 19, 2011)

  • In 2009, the Pittsylvania County Board of Supervisors called for "a study to determine no harm would come to the county and its residents before the moratorium could be lifted... The resolution being discussed at Tuesday's board meeting stated the NAS study showed Virginia has no experience with uranium mining and there's no guarantee there would be no release of radioactive sediments downstream of the Coles Hill site and, therefore, the criteria of the original resolution in 2009 have not been satisfied." (Danville Register and Bee, September 5, 2012)

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September 12, 2012

Jeff Schapiro of the Richmond Times-Dispatch editorializes, "The city of Chesapeake this week is expected to join Norfolk, Virginia Beach and Suffolk in opposing uranium mining. This may not get the attention of local legislators, many of whom are Republicans and tend to tut-tut environmental concerns. But the worries of Greens are being spun as a threat to a different kind of green: cash generated by tourism, the military and global shipping. The Hampton Roads Chamber of Commerce, perhaps by next month, could come out against mining as an economic peril, making it a lot easier for self-styled pro-business Republicans to just say no to [uranium mining at] Coles Hill."

Progressive Point: Our leaders are elected to promote and protect our safety. Corporate interests and their lobbyists are pushing politicians to get rid of the ban on uranium mining, a ban that protects our clean drinking water. Communities across Virginia are rejecting uranium mining in Virginia and it's time for our leaders to do the same.

We need leaders who work for us--and will prioritize keeping us and the water we drink safe from radioactive waste--not the special interests who paid for their campaigns and have the most lobbyists. The middle class jobs of the future are in clean energy manufacturing. We should be creating these jobs now to stay competitive with countries like China. Clean energy will keep our economy moving forward and keeping the ban will keep Virginia safe without risking our communities' health.

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  • Those communities against removing the uranium ban will include Chesapeake this week, Norfolk, Virginia Beach, and Suffolk. (Richmond Times-Dispatch, September 12, 2012) The South Boston Town Council also approved a second $5,000 contribution this week to help keep the ban. (Gazette-Virginian, Sept. 10, 2012)
  • Virginia Uranium, the company seeing to mine uranium in Virginia, has hired over a dozen lobbyists from five different firms and has donated over $150,000 to political campaigns in the last 4 years. (VPAP)

  • Del. Donald Merricks, Del. Danny Marshall III, Del. James Edmunds, Del. Tommy Wright, and Sen. Frank Ruff all said in a letter to Virginia's General Assembly that the risk of uranium mining to the people of Virginia and its environment is too great and that the ban should not be lifted. (Virginian-Pilot, January 3, 2012)

  • A recent NAS study validated the concern that a flood, hurricane, or earthquake could result in an uncontrolled release at a uranium facility--all three of which Virginia experienced last year. (Cale Jaffe, senior attorney, Southern Environmental Law Center, Keep the Ban, December 19, 2011)

  • In 2009, the Pittsylvania County Board of Supervisors called for "a study to determine no harm would come to the county and its residents before the moratorium could be lifted... The resolution being discussed at Tuesday's board meeting stated the NAS study showed Virginia has no experience with uranium mining and there's no guarantee there would be no release of radioactive sediments downstream of the Coles Hill site and, therefore, the criteria of the original resolution in 2009 have not been satisfied." (Danville Register and Bee, September 5, 2012)

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September 5, 2012

The Danville Register and Bee reports, "As it has so many times before, the uranium mining question dominated much of the public comments portion of the most recent meeting of the Pittsylvania County Board of Supervisors The comments Tuesday night were about a resolution on uranium mining and milling on the agenda for the meeting but taken off at the start by Banister District Supervisor Jessie Barksdale."

Progressive Point: Virginia leaders should put our health and safety ahead of corporate profits. Virginia's ban on uranium mining protects our families by keeping our water clean, safe, and drinkable. Eliminating those protections might help big corporate campaign contributors, but at the expense of our families.

Corporate special interests are trying to undo the rules we put in place after learning the hard way, from our broken health care system to the Wall Street meltdown, that cutting corners doesn't create jobs, it kills them. Common sense safeguards protect the food we eat, the water we drink, and the air we breathe. Our Commonwealth will move forward when we focus on creating jobs and not cutting common sense safeguards.

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  • Virginia Uranium, the company seeing to mine uranium in Virginia, has hired over a dozen lobbyists from five different firms and has donated over $150,000 to political campaigns in the last 4 years. (VPAP)

  • Del. Donald Merricks, Del. Danny Marshall III, Del. James Edmunds, Del. Tommy Wright, and Sen. Frank Ruff all said in a letter to Virginia's General Assembly that the risk of uranium mining to the people of Virginia and its environment is too great and that the ban should not be lifted. (Virginian-Pilot, January 3, 2012)

  • A recent NAS study validated the concern that a flood, hurricane, or earthquake could result in an uncontrolled release at a uranium facility--all three of which Virginia experienced last year. (Cale Jaffe, senior attorney, Southern Environmental Law Center, Keep the Ban, December 19, 2011)

  • In 2009, the Pittsylvania County Board of Supervisors called for "a study to determine no harm would come to the county and its residents before the moratorium could be lifted... The resolution being discussed at Tuesday's board meeting stated the NAS study showed Virginia has no experience with uranium mining and there's no guarantee there would be no release of radioactive sediments downstream of the Coles Hill site and, therefore, the criteria of the original resolution in 2009 have not been satisfied." (Danville Register and Bee, September 5, 2012)

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